What We Can Learn About Pricing From a Dead Squirrel — Excellent-Supply.com ##TITLE## - (Rick Gelinas, Excellent Supply) Skip to content
What We Can Learn About Pricing From a Dead Squirrel

What We Can Learn About Pricing From a Dead Squirrel

I recently read an interesting business article about pricing. It made me think about our industry. The story relates to charging a highish price for what was perceived as a very needed service. It's a story about a pest removal company who removed a dead squirrel from underneath a porch. The service reportedly took 5 minutes and the bill was $125. And the homeowner was delighted to pay it. 

Click the link to read the Fast Company Article:

http://www.fastcompany.com/3000999/what-dead-squirrel-taught-me-about-premium-pricing?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+fastcompany%2Fheadlines+%28Fast+Company%29

This begs the question... are you charging what you're really worth for your services? I'm not proposing that you spike your prices just for the sake of raising prices. But if you build a valuable service that's conveyed as top-notch service, then a higher price is reasonable. In the case of the squirrel man, all he brought to the table was a flashlight and a dead animal grabbing tool. I think most of us are bringing more artillery than that when we show up to provide our service. 

Build a quality service from top to bottom, and then set your prices in terms of what youre worth. Like the removal of the dead squirrel, we are providing services that improve the quality of their environment. This improves health and morale. It makes their business more presentable to their customers. And it extends the useful life of their carpet. The benefits we bring them are huge. Like the person who gladly paid the price for the removal of the dead squirrel, if we present ourselves as professionals and deliver excellent service, our clients will be happy to meet our bidding too. 

I hope you enjoyed the article, and hopefully it got the wheels turning.

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